The Eric Dolch Children's Encephilitis Foundation
Donate today


The Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Foundation is dedicated to raising money and awareness for the proper care and treatment for children with encephalitis while helping to find a cure for encephalitis and other types of epilepsy.


News And Events

HEADLINES:

  • Clearwater's Berrys Use Their Wedding To Help The Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Foundation

  • The Inaugural Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Foundation Golf Tournament was a Smashing Success on Every Level

  • Miami Children's Hospital Doctors Support Inaugural Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Tournament at PGA National

  • Tom Dominic's Family and Friends Donated to the EDCEF

  • Eric's Foundation makes donation to NCHCF

  • Eric Celebrates 19th birthday; Recovering From Surgery

  • Eric Back Home Recovering From Another Brain Surgery

  • Eric to have brain surgery Dec. 15

  • Eric Dolch Foundation makes donation to Miami Children's Hospital

  • Eric Dolch turns 17, continues recovery

  • Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Foundation Formed

  • Eric Dolch back at home, making steady progress
  • Clearwater's Berrys Use Their Wedding To Help Charities

    It’s common at a funeral for donations to be made to non-profit and charity organizations as a way of remembering a person’s life.

    But Allison and Ben Berry of Clearwater took a different approach when they were married this year, they asked their guests, in lieu of gifts, to make donations to a pair of non-profits: The Eric Dolch Children’s Encephalitis Foundation and the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer.  

    Eric Dolch is Allison’s 22-year-old cousin who contracted encephalitis in 2005 in West Palm Beach and has been left severely disabled. The Berrys donated $500 to Eric’s foundation and an additional $500 to help with Eric’s ongoing medical expenses.

    “It was the first thing that popped into our minds when we were thinking about doing something like this,” said Berry, who grew up in Jacksonville as Allison Sasser and is an elementary-school teacher in Clearwater. “I know how much Eric and his family has been though. We just wanted to do something to try and help out.”

    Eric’s father, Craig Dolch, EDCEF’s executive director and a journalist who also was born and raised in Jacksonville, said he was shocked when he arrived at the wedding at the Sandpearl Resort in Clearwater to see his son’s foundation (www.ericdolchfoundation.org) mentioned in his niece’s wedding program.

    “For Allison and Ben to think about my son Eric on the most wonderful day of their lives speaks to the type of loving and caring people they are,” Craig Dolch said. “I have never heard of somebody doing something like this on a day that’s supposed to be all about them. What an incredible gesture.”


    The Inaugural Eric Dolch Children’s Encephalitis Foundation Golf Tournament was a Smashing Success on Every Level

    The inaugural Eric Dolch Children’s Encephalitis Foundation Golf Tournament, held Saturday, July 13 at PGA National, was a smashing success on virtually every level - the 144-player field was sold out weeks in advance, Eric was able to be at the event, there was media coverage from all of the local TV stations and the Palm Beach Post, and, most importantly, close to $20,000 was raised for Eric’s foundation.

    “As a first-year event, we had no idea what to expect,” said Craig Dolch, Eric’s father and the executive director of the Eric Dolch Children’s Encephalitis Foundation. “What happened far exceeded our expectations. It was a humbling and uplifting day to experience all of the support.”

    Eric’s neurologist, Dr. Trevor Resnick, the Chief of Neurology at Miami Children’s Hospital, and Dr. Narendra Kini, the hospital’s president/CEO, were among the golfers who covered the Fazio Course at PGA National after the 8:30 a.m. shotgun start.

    “There are a lot of people who want to support Eric and the Dolch family after what they have gone through,” said Olin Browne, a three-time PGA Tour winner who was at the tournament as friend and a member of Eric’s foundation board of directors. “That’s what you see out here today- a lot of love.” 

    Fortunately, the rains that had been soaking South Florida in weeks leading up to the tournament, stayed away long enough for the players to get in 16 holes before lightning finally stopped action around 1:15 p.m.

    The golfers headed to the Fraternal Order of Eagles 4018 in Lake Park for a barbeque to award the tournament prizes and hand out more than $15,000 in raffle items.

    “This tournament was without a doubt a home run,” Craig Dolch said. “What a way to start. Everyone who was here was part of history because this tournament is only going to get better and better.”

    Miami Children's Hospital Doctors Support Inaugural Eric Dolch Children’s Encephalitis Tournament at PGA National

    We’ve all heard the cliche about the doctor not being in because he is playing golf, but when Dr. Narendra Kini, Dr. Trevor Resnick and Dr. Michael Duchowny - the President/CEO, Chief of Neurology and Epilepsy Program Director at Miami Children’s Hospital, respectively - hit the links last Saturday, it was because they wanted to support one of their former patients.

    The three doctors were among a full field of 144 players in the inaugural Eric Dolch Children’s Encephalitis Foundation Golf Tournament at PGA National Resort & Spa in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. The 22-year-old Dolch was 14 when he spent 115 days in a medically-induced coma at Miami Children’s - at the time a record length for an encephalitis patient at MCH. Eric was in Miami Children’s Pediatric Intensive Care Unit for more than a year before returning to his West Palm Beach home in the fall of 2006, severely disabled from the brain injury.

    “It was heartwarming to see the sheer number of folks who turned up,” Dr. Kini said. “This means they were all impacted by Eric’s experience. We try to support in any way we can and this opportunity to come into another community, that we serve, for a family who is part of ours, was the right thing to do.”

    Said Dr. Resnick: “We like to be as supportive as we can, as often we can. We know what the Dolch family has been through and their commitment to help patients like Eric is commendable. Showing up is the least we can do.”

    The Eric Dolch Children’s Encephalitis Foundation was started by Eric’s father, Craig, a golf journalist, in 2006. The foundation has awarded more than $20,000 in grants so far - which is about the amount of money raised at Saturday’s event.

    “To have these doctors take time out from their busy schedules and support my son’s foundation tournament says plenty about the compassion we’ve always felt from Miami Children’s Hospital,” Craig Dolch said. “They helped us get through one of our family’s most heartbreaking moments - and still do."

    Dr. Kini showed some skills, hitting a shot to 2 feet, 8 inches on the par-3 fifth hole of the Fazio Course at PGA National to win closest-to-the-pin honors. He won a set of Oakley sunglasses.

    for his handicap, Dr. Kini joked, “It’s way higher than I desire.”


    Tom Dominic’s Family and Friends Have Donated More Than $4,000 To The EDCEF In Memory of His Wife, Tina

    Tina Dominic

    Tom Dominic has seen the cruel effects encephalitis can have on a family. He had a brother-in-law, Rocci, who has contracted the disease not once but twice, leaving him legally blind. Tom also has a niece, Stacey, who has suffered from encephalitis for more than a year.

    So when Tom’s wife of 42 years, Tina, of Medford, N.J., died suddenly on Aug. 3, Tom knew he wanted to do something other than have his family and friends make the traditional donations.

    “I didn’t want a bunch of flowers,” Tom said. “So I asked my daughter-in-law, Maria, to look on the Internet to see if there are any foundations that do encephalitis research. I’ve seen how hard that disease can be on families. Within seconds, Maria, said, ‘Found one.’ "

    Maria had found the Eric Dolch Children’s Encephalitis Foundation (EDCEF), a 501 (c) (3) non-profit that had been started in West Palm Beach, Fla., in 2006 after Eric contracted encephalitis and was left severely disabled. Dominic’s family and friends have donated more than $4,000, at last count, to EDCEF, in memory of Tina.

    “She died so suddenly, we never talked about this,” Tom said. “But I know this is something Tina would be proud we’re doing.”

    Craig Dolch, Eric’s father and EDCEF’s chairman, says he was surprised when his son’s foundation started receiving a large increase of donations last week. When he saw they were all in memory of Tina Dominic, he googled her name.

    “One of the stories that came up was Tina's obituary, unfortunately, and at the end it said: ‘In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in Tina’s memory to the Eric Dolch Children’s Encephalitis Foundation,’ ” Dolch said. “When I read that, it just kind of took my breath away. Here’s a family, mourning a great loss, and they’re thinking of others.

    “Tom is correct. Tina would be proud. My son's foundation is thrilled to receive these donations in memory of Tina."

    Back to top

    Eric Dolch Children’s Encephalitis Foundation Makes $5,000 Donation to New Miami Children’s Hospital Nicklaus Care Centers In Palm Beach County

    Donation of check to Nicklaus Care Centers

    Eric Dolch Children’s Encephalitis Foundation presents a check to the Nicklaus Children’s Health Care Foundation (NCHCF). In the photo from left to right: Jack and Barbara Nicklaus; Eric’s mom Ava Van de Water; Eric Dolch; President/CEO of Miami Children’s Hospital Dr. M. Narendra Kini, NCHCF president Patty McDonald and Eric’s father Craig Dolch.Photo credit Jim Mandeville.

    When Eric Dolch almost died from encephalitis in 2005, his parents airlifted the then-14-year-old West Palm Beach resident to Miami Children’s Hospital (MCH), where he spent more than a year recovering from the near-fatal illness in the hospital’s Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Now 19, Eric is helping other children fight back from life-threatening illnesses. Monday, the Eric Dolch Children’s Encephalitis Foundation (EDCEF) made a $5,000 donation to the Nicklaus Children’s Health Care Foundation. The money is designated to be used for the new Nicklaus Care Centers that MCH is bringing to Palm Beach County to improve the area’s acute pediatric health care.

    Talk about good timing: The initial MCH Nicklaus Care Center opened today behind Palms West Hospital in Loxahatchee. EDCEF’s donation has been earmarked for the care centers’ neurology department. The MCH Nicklaus Care Center will initially offer services in pediatric craniofacial, endocrinology, gastroenterology, neurology and orthopedic. Their presence will free many chronically-ill children in Palm Beach County from making the difficult drive to Miami Children’s Hospital to receive services.

    “We are very excited about the opening of the first "Care Center," and we hope and pray that it will be a blessing for Eric and many other children,” said Barbara Nicklaus, who along with husband/golf legend Jack Nicklaus has been the driving forces behind the NCHCF.

    “MCH and our foundation are totally dedicated to making this work. This donation from the Eric Dolch Children’s Encephalitis Foundation will be a huge boost for the neurology department.”

    Eric was hospitalized June 20, 2005 at St. Mary’s Hospital in West Palm Beach when he started having seizures. Eight days later, he was airlifted to Miami Children’s Hospital because of the complexities of his illness. He was placed in a medically-induced coma for 115 days, emerging severely disabled because of the brain injury.
    Although he returned to his West Palm Beach home in late 2006, where he has received around-the-clock nursing, Eric has undergone 14 surgeries, including two arduous operations on the brain that each required a minimum of 10 hours.

    This marks the third contribution EDCEF – a non-private, 501 (c) (3) foundation – has made since it was founded in 2006 by Eric’s parents and close friends.

    “We wish we could give 100 times this amount,” said Craig Dolch, Eric’s father and the founder of EDCEF, “but we’ve learned from experience that every bit helps.”

    That sentiment was echoed by Dr. M. Narendra Kini, the President/CEO of Miami Children’s, who was at the presentation along with the Nicklauses; Eric’s mom and EDCEF board member, Ava Van de Water; NCHCF president Patty McDonald; Craig Dolch; and, of course Eric.

    “We’ve noticed that in these troubled economic times, most of the donations that we get are all of moderate and smaller size, and they happen to be more widespread in a new community than a single, large donation,” Dr. Kini said. “In a brand-new matter likes this, every small amount counts because we want to set up the initial services in a community. To get it up and running is more important than the size and complexity of the operations

    “This is a huge impact on starting the operation. We need to get the services to start. And that’s what’s most important for the community.”

    McDonald said there are plans to open more MCH Nicklaus Care Centers in Palm Beach County, with the next one likely slated for the north county area later this year.

    Back to top

    Eric Celebrates 19th Birthday; Recovering From Surgery

    It has been an interesting two weeks leading up to Eric's 19th birthday on May 26. The surgery he underwent May 13 on his right arm was very difficult on him. Lots of bruising, bleeding and pain. They had to remove the pins from his knuckles early because his skin was stretched so tight, the doctor didn't want to risk Eric losing some of the skin and needing grafts down the road. But Eric showed a lot of improvement when he went back to the hand surgeon this week. We are expecting to get the sutures out next week and Eric will return to physical therapy.

    We were also handed a sheet of paper yesterday by Eric's Homebound teacher -- it was his high school diploma. Obviously, receiving your son's high school diploma in the living room is a bittersweet occasion. But the more we think about it, we are simply grateful that Eric is still around to receive such things. While he certainly has a long way to go, we cannot forget how far he has come in the last five years. Eric continues to fight on.

    We celebrate by taking Eric to an all-you-can-eat pizza buffet, so he can have his favorite meal.

    Back to top

    Eric Back Home Recovering From Another Brain Surgery

    Eric Dolch has returned to his West Palm Beach, Fla. home to continue healing after undergoing a 10-hour brain surgery Dec. 11 at Miami Children's Hospital. Eric, 17, contracted near-fatal encephalitis 3 1/2 years ago.

    Eric had portions of his brain disconnected in order to alleviate the number of seizures he had been experiencing. The surgery was performed by Dr. John Ragheb, the Director of the Neurosurgery Department at Miami Children's.

    "It took a lot longer than we expected because there was excessive bleeding," Dr. Ragheb said. "It will probably be months before we really learn the success of the operation."

    Dr. Ragheb also operated on Eric on June 27, 2006, a surgery that eventually allowed Eric to initially return to his West Palm Beach home after spending more than 15 months at Miami Children's Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, as well as other hospitals in West Palm Beach, Miami and Boston.

    Eric was just about to enter high school when he was hospitalized on June 20, 2005, eventually diagnosed with encephalitis, which is swelling of the brain. Eric, who had just turned 14, was placed into a medically-induced coma by doctors at Nicklaus Children's Hospital in West Palm Beach to protect his brain from seizures before he was airlifted a week later to Miami Children's Hospital. He spent 115 days in the coma, which doctors at Miami Children's say is a record length of stay in a coma for an encephalitis patient at their facility.

    After trying rehabilitation at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami and Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, Eric returned to Miami Children's on March 17, 2006 because of his extensive medical problems.

    Eric left Miami Children's on Aug. 31, 2006 to return to his West Palm Beach home where he continues to receive around-the-clock nursing from incredible nurses such as Alex Restrepo, her brother Carlos, her mother Janet, and Gloria Nelson.

    Eric will again start receiving therapy at the Rehabilitation Center for Children and Adults in Palm Beach, where he gets great care from physical therapists Ellen O'Bannon, Rich Sylvester and Barbara Candales; orthopedic therapist Kelli Jacobs and speech therapist Jaclyn Theeck. He has a great Homebound teacher in Mrs. Frances Dyben, and his wonderful Homebound therapists are Despina Hall, Andrea Flynn and Margo Perez.

    Back to top

    Eric to have brain surgery December 15


    Eric Dolch will have brain surgery performed Dec. 15 at Miami Children's Hospital as he continues his battle from near-fatal encephalitis he contracted 3 1/2 years ago.

    Eric, 17, will have portions of his brain disconnected in order to alleviate the number of seizures he's been having recently. The surgery will be performed by Dr. John Ragheb, the Director of the Neurosurgery Department at Miami Children's.

    Dr. Ragheb also operated on Eric on June 27, 2006, a surgery that eventually allowed Eric to return to his West Palm Beach home after spending more than 15 months at Miami Children's Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, as well as hospitals in West Palm Beach, Miami and Boston.

    Eric was just about to enter high school when he was hospitalized on June 20, 2005, eventually diagnosed with encephalitis, which is swelling of the brain; Eric, who had just turned 14, was placed into a medically-induced coma by doctors at Nicklaus Children's Hospital in West Palm Beach to protect his brain from seizures before he was airlifted a week later to Miami Children's Hospital. He spent 115 days in the coma, which doctors at Miami Children's say is a record length of stay in a coma for an encephalitis patient at their facility.

    After trying rehabilitation at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami and Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, Eric returned to Miami Children's on March 17, 2006 because of his extensive medical problems. He underwent brain surgery in June of 2006 to help alleviate the seizures.

    Eric left Miami Children's on Aug. 31, 2006 to return to his West Palm Beach home where he continues to receive around-the-clock nursing from incredible nurses such as Alex Restrepo, her brother Carlos, her mother Janet, and Gloria Nelson.

    Eric will again start receiving therapy three times a week at the Rehabilitation Center for Children and Adults in Palm Beach, where he gets great care from physical therapists Ellen O'Bannon, Rich Sylvester and Barbara Candales; orthopedic therapist Kelli Jacobs and speech therapist Jaclyn Theeck. He has a great Homebound teacher in Mrs. Frances Dyben, and his wonderful Homebound therapists are Despina Hall, Andrea Flynn and Margo Perez.

    Back to top

    Eric Dolch Foundation makes donation to Miami Children's Hospital

    Doctors will never know why Eric Dolch went from being a healthy 14-year-old boy to someone who was fighting for his life after he was diagnosed with encephalitis on June 20, 2005. But a foundation created in Eric Dolch's name hopes to someday provide answers for other children and adults stricken with this neurological illness.

    The Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Foundation, the first known foundation in the U.S. that deals specifically with encephalitis, recently made it first donation as a 501(c)(3) entity. EDCEF donated almost $6,000 to the Miami Children's Hospital Foundation to fund a computer system that will help doctors do a better job of tracking and treating epilepsy patients.

    "The generous donation of the imaging workstation by the Dolch Foundation will perform state of the art digital analysis of all aspects of neurological function, including electrical measurements of activity occurring within the brain, as well as chemical and anatomical measurements obtained from MRI and functional imaging tests," said Dr. Trevor J. Resnick, the chief of neurology at Miami Children's Hospital.

    "The advanced processing that the computer performs will allow subtle differences to be identified that are otherwise invisible to the human eye. Similar to uncovering microscopic evidence at the scene of a crime, such clues will help the Miami Children's Brain Institute identify treatable conditions in children, and more precisely define which part of the brain is being injured, and improve the effectiveness of treatment while at the same time lowering its risk."

    The Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Foundation was formed by his parents, Ava Van de Water and Craig Dolch, in March of 2006, nine months after their son contracted near-fatal encephalitis and spent more than a year in hospitals in Florida and Massachusetts. Eric returned to his West Palm Beach home in the fall of 2006 and continues to recover from encephalitis.

    The foundation's mission is to raise money for encephalitis and epilepsy research, to help area hospitals in South Florida diagnose and treat the disease, to raise public awareness for encephalitis and epilepsy and to make sure all children receive the same quality of medical care as adults and senior citizens.

    "No child or family should have to go through what Eric and our family has experienced over the past three years," Van de Water said. "It truly is a parent's worst nightmare to have your child suffer from this insidious disease, and you don't even know how or why it happened -- or what's going to happen to your child on a long-term basis."

    Encephalitis is a rare disease that affects approximately 1 out of every 200,000 individuals, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Encephalitis is most common in children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems.

    The Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Foundation received its 501(c)(3) non-profit designation by the Internal Revenue Code in the fall of 2006.

    Back to top

    Eric and his sister Alex

    Eric Dolch turns 17, continues recovery

    Now 17, Eric Dolch continues to make his recovery from near-fatal encephalitis with family and friends at his West Palm Beach home. This Labor Day weekend marked the two-year anniversary of Eric returning home after spending more than 15 months at Miami Children's Hospital's Pediatric Intensive Care, as well as hospitals in West Palm Beach, Miami and Boston.

    Eric was hospitalized on June 20, 2005, eventually diagnosed with encephalitis, which is swelling of the brain, when he was 14. Eric was placed into a medically-induced coma by doctors at Nicklaus Children's Hospital in West Palm Beach to protect his brain from seizures before he was airlifted a week later to Miami Children's Hospital. He spent 115 days in a coma, which doctors at Miami Children's say is a record length of stay in a coma for an encephalitis patient at their facility.

    After trying rehabilitation at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami and Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, Eric returned to Miami Children's on March 17, 2006 because of his extensive medical problems. He underwent brain surgery in June of 2006 to help alleviate the seizures.

    Eric left Miami Children's on Aug. 31, 2006 to return to his West Palm Beach home where he continues to receive around-the-clock nursing.

    Eric receives therapy three times a week at the Rehabilitation Center for Children and Adults in Palm Beach, getting great care from physical therapists Ellen O'Bannon, Rich Sylvester and Barbara Candales; orthopedic therapist Kelli Jacobs and speech therapist Jaclyn Theeck. He has a great Homebound teacher in Mrs. Frances Dyben and occasionally attends Royal Palm Beach School in Lantana.



    Back to top


    Don and Mary Anne Shula attend Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Foundation fundraiser at Old Palm Golf Club
    (photograph by Michael Price)

    Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Foundation formed.

    On March 6, 2006, the parents of Eric Dolch, a young man diagnosed with encephalitis when he was only 14 years old, announced the formation of the Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Foundation (EDCEF) -- the first known foundation in the U.S. that deals specifically with encephalitis, according to a spokesman for the U.S. Epilepsy Foundation. The Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Foundation's mission is to raise money for encephalitis and epilepsy research, to help area hospitals in South Florida diagnose and treat the disease, to raise public awareness for encephalitis and epilepsy and to make sure all children receive the same quality of medical care as adults and senior citizens.

    "No child or family should have to go through what Eric and our family has experienced over the past 14 months," said Eric's mother, Ava Van de Water of West Palm Beach. "It truly is a parent's worst nightmare to have your child suffer from this insidious disease, and you don't even know how or why it happened -- or what's going to happen to your child on a long-term basis."

    Encephalitis (pronounced: in-seh-fuh-lye-tus) is an inflammation of the brain that causes swelling. The disease can be fatal in some cases and it can lead to acquired brain injury and severe disabilities. Encephalitis is usually caused by a virus, but other things, including bacteria, may cause it as well. In Eric's case, the only thing he tested positive for was Mycoplasma, a bacteria that can cause encephalitis but also could have been in his body from an earlier infection.

    Encephalitis is a rare disease that affects approximately 1 out of every 200,000 individuals, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Encephalitis is most common in children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems. Approximately 2,000 cases of encephalitis are reported every year, but doctors suspect that many more may go unreported because the symptoms are so mild. The latest trends are becoming more alarming.

    "We are seeing more children with encephalitis every year," said Dr. Andre Raszynski, the director of the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Miami Children's Hospital -- where Eric spent almost four months in a doctor-induced coma. "We used to get 2 or 3 cases a year; now we're getting 10 to 15. We don't know why that is happening, but unfortunately we are seeing more children like Eric every year."

    Dr. Raszynski said he believes Eric spent the longest time in a medically-induced coma (115) at Miami Children's than any other encephalitis patient. Eric, now 15, was initially hospitalized at Nicklaus Children's Hospital in West Palm Beach on June 20 -- the day after Father's Day -- before being airlifted to Miami Children's eight days later. Eric tried to go through rehabilitation at Miami Jackson Memorial and Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston beofre returning to Miami Children's Hospital in March because of medical issues. Eric is still at Miami Children's, but his doctors believe he soon may finally be able to go home. Doctors say it could take months before they'll know how Eric will come out of this illness on a long-term basis.

    Ava Van de Water is a real estate broker at Brown Harris Stevens in Palm Beach. Eric would have been a freshman at Cardinal Newman High. He has a 17-year-old sister, Alexandra.

    The Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Foundation has applied for 501(c)(3) non-profit designation by the Internal Revenue Code. That process takes between six and nine months. Meantime, The Eric Dolch Children's Encephalitis Foundation as incorporated with the State of Florida and can operate as a foundation until it officially receives that designation from the IRS.

    Back to top

    Eric Dolch back at home, making steady progress

    After spending more than 14 months in four hospitals and two in-patient rehabilitation facilities, Eric Dolch has finally returned home as he continues to recover from a severe case of encephalitis.

    Eric, 15, left Miami Children's Hospital on Aug. 31 to make the 90-minute ride by ambulance to his West Palm Beach home. He had been hospitalized on June 20, 2005, meaning he had been away from his home and family for 437 days, spending time at Nicklaus Children's Hospital in West Palm Beach, Miami Children's Hospital, Miami Jackson Memorial Hospital, Spaulding Rehabilitation in Boston and Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Eric has made steady progress during his time at home. He has gained 30 pounds as he has been able to slowly start eating foods again. He is getting therapy three times a week at the Rehabilitation Center for Children and Adults in Palm Beach and he also has a teacher come to the home twice a week.

    It will be months before we will learn how Eric will come out of this illness from a long-term basis. But as the doctors and nurses always say -- slow progress is better than no progress.

    And as everyone knows -- there's no place like home!

    Back to top






    Web site by Indie Atlantic Co.